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An Agile Primer: Agile Estimating and the “MoSCoW Process”

An Agile Primer: Agile Estimating and the “MoSCoW Process”
By Chuck Snead

One common criticism of Agile Development methodologies by those used to more predictive methods is that Agile Development does not guarantee that all listed features will be completed by the end of a project. However, this is by design. What Agile Development does promise to do is to focus development on the features most relevant to the end users first, while providing the option to add more if time permits. This is an important distinction.

Because the end point of the predictive planning process for Traditional projects is a relatively inviolate development schedule, product owners and end users have been trained to take an “everything but the kitchen sink” mentality when converging on a solution, since the change control process tends to discourage the addition of more features once a project has been started. Product owners in Traditional projects also tend to have little control over the order in which features are produced, since development order is often determined more by efficiency of development than prioritization based on business value; the reason being that order shouldn’t matter, since everything is going to be delivered anyway. Read the Complete Article

Structured Agility: Developing an Agile Project Charter

Structured Agility: Developing an Agile Project Charter
By Chuck Snead

The PMBOK v5 defines creating the project charter as “the process of developing a document that formally authorizes the existence of a project and provides the project manager with the authority to apply organizational resources to project activities.”

On the surface, this may sound totally non-Agile, but from a project integration standpoint, this is a very key document for both SDLC and Agile projects because it defines their boundaries, who the key stakeholders are, and it provides a vehicle for the organization to formally commit to the projects. Obviously, the type of organization and needs of the project will determine how the charter gets produced.

Most organizations (especially large ones) have a formal process for defining, selecting, and authorizing projects. For Agile projects, the fundamental differences from an SDLC perspective are (1) how much information needs to be provided, and (2) who is involved in creating the charter. Read the Complete Article

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