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Project Sustainability Predators at Work

Project Sustainability Predators at Work
By Gratien Gasaba

Have you ever watched a movie concerning bush meat hunting as performed by the wild big cats such as lions and leopards? Have you noticed that these big cats use a range of tactics to maximize their chances of catching the prey? Have you noticed that these strategies and tactics vary with the nature and kinds of the prey? Needless to say that a predator, say a lion, will never acknowledge to be a predator, instead it would portray itself as an accountable king of the forest that carefully defends its subjects, and righteously uses its upper hand to be fed to maintain health and survive.

In my last post I discussed 9 categories of sustainability stakeholders including the predators. The article postulated that sustainability predators are powerful people who don’t care about lasting solutions which they mostly perceive as threats to their personal interests. Read the Complete Article

4 Tips for a Sustainability-driven Requirements Gathering Process

4 Tips for a Sustainability-driven Requirements Gathering Process
By Gratien Gasaba

A killer question about project sustainability is on its requirements. Project requirements are the cornerstone for sustainability. If the requirements gathering process does not include measures to ensure lasting solutions to problems, the opposite may occur. Analyzing requirements with focus on long term goals will increase chances for sustainability. Other important questions are those about the weight given to each sustainability dimension, how the requirement gathering process starts and tools used as well as the documentation of sustainability related acceptance criteria.

  • Tip 1: Have a sustainability checklist for each dimension

    Before the requirement gathering process starts, it is advised to have a checklist at hand. The checklist will guide the team involved in the requirement gathering process. A good sustainability driven checklist will consist of questions about how the project tackles the four sustainability dimensions. This checklist is a tool that can help those involved in the requirement gathering process to be more consistent with sustainability aspects.

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Requirements Gathering in Project Management: Not Enough If Not Priortized and Ranked

Requirements Gathering in Project Management: Not Enough If Not Priortized and Ranked
By Gratien Gasaba

“If you don’t know where you are going no road will take you there”.

To ensure that one is on the right road one needs to know where this road goes. But it serves for nothing if you don’t know where you are going. Assume you are in a bus station. You may be informed that bus number 1 will take the road to place A, bus number 2 to place B, bus number 3 to place C, etc. What criteria do you use to choose a right bus and to ensure you don’t get lost? The necessary and sufficient criterion is to know where you want to go. In the above illustrative particular case, if you want to go to the Place C, you will take the bus number 3 and exclude from your choice all other buses. Read the Complete Article

Managing Low Priority Project Risks

Managing Low Priority Project Risks
By Gratien Gasaba

Introduction

Risks management is all about the identification and the treatment of risks. The treatment of risks includes qualitative and quantitative analysis, response planning and risk monitoring and controlling. The qualitative analysis of risks is all about “prioritizing risks for further analysis or action by assessing and combining their probability of occurrence and impact” (Project Management Body of Knowledge: PMBOK@Guide fourth edition). The output of this process is the risk register updates. While risks are identified in a jumble, the “perform qualitative risk analysis “categorizes risks into high, moderate and low risks. While the high priority risks move either to the “perform quantitative risks analysis process” or “plan risk response process”, the low priority risks are put on the watchlist for continued monitoring.

In the real world, most of the risks on the watchlist are forgotten, in drawers, as the project manager focuses on high priority risks. Read the Complete Article

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