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Project Management – Conducting Procurements

Project Management – Conducting Procurements
By Jason Rich, Northwest University

Conducting procurements is where you sign on the dotted line. By now you should have sent out your request of information, proposals and quotes, and are now ready to choose a supplier or vendor. Often times a bidder’s conference may be needed. A bidder’s conference is a meeting with all of the qualified bidders’ to clarify requirements and let the bidders’ ask any questions that they may have before they submit their bids. From there all the bids will be complied and evaluated by you and your team. The evaluation process can be more formal or less so depending on the significance of the procurement. Often the bids or proposals are weighed against specific criteria that have been set by you and the team ahead of time. Once you pick a winner the contract is awarded. Sometimes there may be a formal appeal process that a losing bidder may initiate, this is uncommon in the private sector but may be in place when dealing with government contracts. Read the Complete Article

Why Do a Project?

Why Do a Project?
By Jason Rich, Northwest University

Simply put, we do projects to achieve a result that we would not be able to get otherwise. Using ongoing operations we can build thousands of iPhone 8’s, but we could never create the iPhone 9. Using ongoing operations we can build all the Boeing 777’s we like but we could never build the 787. In short we use projects to push us forward and meet needs.

Every product that you use on a regular basis, from your toothbrush to the gas in your car is available to you because a project was done to design it, or determine how to get it. Or, in the case of your gas, several projects were done to get it, refine it, and ship it. There were countless more projects done to create the tools that were used in all of those projects. Projects are so ingrained in our culture and lives that it is some times hard to see them. Read the Complete Article

A Short Guide on Controlling Changes in Project Management

A Short Guide on Controlling Changes in Project Management
By Jason Rich, Northwest University

Changes will happen, it is a fact of projects. Changes can happen because the customer requests something different, or because you have a better understanding of needs as things progress. Changes can also happen as markets change, or as technology changes. There will be change, so get used to it. All changes should be run through the change control process that was established in the project management plan. If the project is big enough, then a formal panel of stakeholders may be assigned to a change control board. Their job will be to analyze the change requests and determine the impact of the change on: schedule, cost, risk, quality, and staffing. Sometimes the change control board will delegate the authority to approve certain changes back to the project manager. For example, if the change is under a capped cost or if the change will not impact the over all schedule. Read the Complete Article

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