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6 Steps to Defining IT Project Requirements

6 Steps to Defining IT Project Requirements
By Kathlika Thomas

We all know that defining IT project requirements is a crucial task when initiating new projects. But did you know that Standish Group’s CHAOS Report shows that a clear statement of requirements is one of the top three reasons for project success? Since it is clear that defining requirements is one of the top PM best practices, we have compiled a series of steps that every project team should follow in order to get on the track to success.

  1. Business and Functional Requirements. The first step is for the IT project team and end users to define and document all of the business and functional requirements of the project. This process begins with a requirements document. This document details all business and functional requirements of the project. It details the “what” of the project.
  2. Design Requirements. Next, the team and users define the design requirements and add them to the requirements document.

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How To Deal With Project Setbacks

How To Deal With Project Setbacks
By Kathlika Thomas

Managing changes to project schedules is an adjustment that is often needed when project setbacks are faced or when your team experiences negative project progress. Is this issue simply a result of poor planning? What are the causes and what can be done about it?

True enough, project setbacks can be encountered as a result of inadequate preparation for upcoming project work. But even when you think everything is properly planned out, problems still arise. Here are a few tips to head off bumps in the road on your project.

Reduce Project Overload

Most intuitively, too much project work is sure to cause the very best project team to fumble their assignment. An overly aggressive project timeline leaves little room for realistic scheduling throughout planning, design, build, and testing and will increase problems encountered on a project exponentially as time passes. While it may seem the norm in certain industries, overworked resources are counter-productive at the end of the day and will only result in stress to your project’s critical path and increased recidivism. Read the Complete Article

Combating the Challenges of a Matrix Organization

Combating the Challenges of a Matrix Organization
By Kathlika Thomas

When project teams are built in preparation for an upcoming assignment, the structure of the surrounding enterprise organization can greatly affect how easy it is to gather resources and how a project is managed from start to finish. While tradition has it that businesses are usually organized around functional groups – i.e., the sales team is managed by a sales manager, the finance team is managed by a finance manager, etc. – most organizations have transitioned into matrix organizational structures. What exactly does that mean and what sort of problems did it solve?

Matrix Organization

Matrix Organization

A matrix company is more like a mix between a strictly functional organization and one that’s been “projectized” (interesting word but don’t blame me for it… that’s all PMI). For example, on a team that is strictly functional, the lead or functional manager has all the say over the team budget and a project manager would likely have no authority. Read the Complete Article

The Post-Project Lessons Learned Session – Who and What

The Post-Project Lessons Learned Session – Who and What
By Kathlika Thomas

Let’s expand on the “who” and the “what” of presenting your post-deployment analysis. First, the “who”: You’ll find that those who are most interested in attending a post-project lessons learned session will fall into three main categories: sponsors, project team members, and clients. The “what” is a little bit more complicated and often depends on your audience. That being the case, let’s highlight what sort of findings will most peak the interest of each of the three attendee groups.

  1. Executive sponsors are often most committed to the success of the project because they were responsible for obtaining a budget for the work. That being the case, discuss in detail with them the profitability of the project’s end results. Depending on how soon after you hold a project lessons learned meeting, you may be able to capture data on the value that your project has brought to your clients.
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1 – A1 Enterprise 286 – Karl Fischer
2 – Aaron Sanders 287 – Kathlika Thomas
3 – Abdulla Alkuwaiti 288 – Katy Whitton
4 – Abhijat Saraswat 289 – Kay Wais
5 – Abhilash Gopi 290 – Kaz Young
6 – Adam Leggett 291 – Keith Custer
7 – Ade Miller 292 – Keith L.
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