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The Project Execution Phase

The Project Execution Phase
By Mark L. Reed

We began our Project Management Lifecycle with Phase One – Concept and Feasibility where we secured agreement with our Project Customer on the definition of the project’s objectives and a high level time and cost against those objectives.

Then we finished our detailed planning of the project with Phase Two – Organization/Schedule where we created our Work Breakdown Structure and Critical Path Analysis to get all stakeholder buy-in to the executable tasks.

Our Project Customer has agreed with us to move forward with a +/- 10% time and cost estimate against the refined and detailed objectives. We now have a project schedule for the team to follow and report on.

Whew! That was a lot of project management work to get our project ready for Phase Three – Execution, but without the pre-work, our execution phase is not properly planned. But we did do it and we are ready to roll. Read the Complete Article

Project Planning: Organization and Schedule

Project Planning: Organization and Schedule
By Mark L. Reed

Let’s begin today’s discussion of how to propagate project success with a quick review of the Four Phases of Project Management Lifecycle; which are:

  • Phase One – Concept and Feasibility
  • Phase Two – Organization and Schedule
  • Phase Three – Execution
  • Phase Four – Review/Audit

We have already discussed how to manage a good Phase One – Concept and Feasibility, so that we can take control of our project by doing our very important homework, on the original work that management had already accomplished regarding the time, cost and objectives of your project.

After a successful (stressful?) presentation of our Phase One findings, we now have agreement with our Project Customer to move into the detailed project planning, aka, Phase Two – Organization and Schedule.

Our Phase Two goal is to get buy-in on all the tasks necessary to complete the Execution Phase of the project and to get another agreement from the Project Customer to a +/- 10 of time and cost against the objectives. Read the Complete Article

Take Control of Your Project With Phase One – Concept and Feasibility – Part 2

Take Control of Your Project With Phase One – Concept and Feasibility – Part 2
By Mark L. Reed

A while ago we began discussing the tasks associated with Phase One – Concept and Feasibility:

  • Project Customer Definition
  • Functional Team Review
  • Kick-off Meeting
  • Communication Plan
  • Objective Definition

In this article we will begin where we left off and complete the Phase One tasks with:

  • Project Definition Document
  • Project Management Plan
  • Project Team Time and Cost Estimates +/- 50%
  • Agreement to Proceed with Project Customer

Project Definition Document and/or Project Management Plan

A Project Definition Document contains all of the information we are discovering during Phase One – Concept and Feasibility. You have done all the work and the Project Definition Document is a handy place to document it and share with all stakeholders.

A Project Management Plan spells out all the steps and tasks necessary during all Four Phases of your Project Management Lifecycle. Read the Complete Article

Take Control of Your Project With Phase One – Concept and Feasibility – Part 1

Take Control of Your Project With Phase One – Concept and Feasibility – Part 1
By Mark L. Reed

We already discussed the difference between a “Business” Lifecycle and a “Project Management” lifecycle and working with the theory that every project is a project within another project; the only project we are responsible and accountable for is our assigned piece of the bigger project. This piece/project is now your number one priority.

We know there are four phases to the project management lifecycle:

  • Phase One – Concept/Feasibility
  • Phase Two – Organization/Schedule
  • Phase Three – Execution
  • Phase Four – Review/Audit

When your boss calls you into the office and tells you that you have six months and one million dollars to do this and that, you really need to make sure you can do it, before agreeing to succeed.

This is where Phase One – Concept/Feasibility begins your Project Management Lifecycle and sets you up to succeed; and if your piece succeeds, then you have done all you possibly can towards the success of the bigger project. Read the Complete Article

How Can I Have the Responsibility Without the Authority?

How Can I Have the Responsibility Without the Authority?
By Mark L. Reed

By far, the question I am most often asked has always been, “How can I get my project team to actually accomplish their tasks on time, if even at all?” After a short discussion, the question translates to, “I don’t have the authority to delegate, but I am responsible for their work, both the quality and the timeliness.”

Most of the time our project team is assigned to us from top management without our say in the matter. These groups of senior managers who are responsible for the division of work within their departments identify personnel for your project based on functional skills and availability.

On paper, the staff planning looks great to them and you are then assigned the project and the team. Unfortunately, more often than not, the best laid plans by the managers who assign our teams head due south (fast!) as reality evolves. Read the Complete Article

Who Owns the Project?

Who Owns the Project?
By Mark L. Reed

Wahoo! – You got the project! Congratulations are in order, but after the immediate euphoria, reality soon rears its sometimes ugly head:

  • Time and cost of your project have been dictated for strategic reasons.
  • The objectives seem subjective and you are not sure what they truly mean.
  • The objectives seem subjective and you are not sure what they truly mean. It seems everyone wants to get their own objectives into your action, but without them taking any responsibility or ownership for the time and cost involved.
  • Someone else has picked your team and no one reports to you as an employee, just as a functional team member and you will be held accountable for the quality of their work.
  • You have been asked to save money at every turn of the project so face-to-face communication is out of the question. I.e.: you have to use the dreaded e-mail.
Read the Complete Article

Business Process vs. Project Management Process

Business Process vs. Project Management Process
By Mark L. Reed

Every project is a project within another project. In other words, every project we manage is a part of another bigger project. So, what is the difference between a business process and a project management process?

Let’s begin the answer with an example…

The CEO of the organization believes the project is to bring a new product to market. Let us call the product the Wireless Internet Waffle Iron (WiWi).

The CEO knows he/she has a process to get the WiWi though his company. This includes identifying the best possible WiWi and all the way to sustaining the WiWi when it is sold to the consumer.

The company has a published plan based on stages for this process (for example; Stage 1 – Ideation, Stage 2 – Assessment, Stage 3 – Feasibility, Stage 4 – Development, Stage 5 – Commercialization, Stage 6 – Sustainment), in order to get the WiWi from one stage to another. Read the Complete Article

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1 – A1 Enterprise 286 – Karl Fischer
2 – Aaron Sanders 287 – Kathlika Thomas
3 – Abdulla Alkuwaiti 288 – Katy Whitton
4 – Abhijat Saraswat 289 – Kay Wais
5 – Abhilash Gopi 290 – Kaz Young
6 – Adam Leggett 291 – Keith Custer
7 – Ade Miller 292 – Keith L.
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