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The Knowledge Circle

The Knowledge Circle
By Peter McBride

Draw a circle. Make 3 pie slices in it.

In one pie slice, write a K. This represents how much you know (on a given topic).

In one pie slice, write the letters DK. This represents how much you don’t Know.

In the last slice, write the letters DKDK. This represents how much you don’t know you don’t know.

Wisdom is gained when we reduce the size of the DK and DKDK slices. We gain when we learn something, and thereby reduce the size of what we Don’t Know.

We gain when we learn that there is something we never knew anything about, thereby reducing the size of what we Don’t Know We Don’t Know. We don’t have to know it, just that we don’t know it yet.

We can be so critical about not knowing; we can get so risk averse waiting for all to be known. Read the Complete Article

Scan the Horizon

Scan the Horizon
By Peter McBride

When I was learning to drive, I was taught to “scan the horizon” all the time. Watch about 1-2 kilometers ahead, then check the car right in front, then check the gauges, then back out to the 1-2 kilometer horizon. You won’t run out of gas (well, you won’t be surprised if you do!), you are less likely to hit the car in front – and you will be able to slow with lots of time if something way up ahead is going wrong.

Project Managers should develop this habit. Scan your project’s horizon, then what’s coming next month, then next week, and then deal with what’s happening right now. Then – BACK to the far horizon, etc. in a non-stop scan. Try to live about 3/4 of our PM life in the future, preparing to deal with what is coming up tomorrow, next week, next month, and about 1/4 of our time checking on the today stuff. Read the Complete Article

Always Grow Your Knowledge

Always Grow Your Knowledge
By Peter McBride

It is truism that we must maintain and grow our professional knowledge and skills, or somehow be left behind. Never mind being left behind – how about simply not knowing what to do? A Project Manager faces new and sometimes unusual challenges with every project. Over time, it becomes more and more difficult to face these challenges, especially if we have an aging or inflexible mental toolkit.

It is difficult to keep up with the latest best (meaning proven) practices in the face of a busy work environment, but it is crucial to one’s continued success. Changes to PMI’s PMBOK, emerging technologies, new business models…all demand our attentions. Not request. Demand!

You can keep up by dedicating a certain amont of time every week to reading relevant journals, a certain amount of time every month to reading new books or attending seminars, and a certain amount of time every year taking professional development courses. Read the Complete Article

Recommended PM App

Recommended PM App

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