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Planning Phase – Project Communication Plan

Planning Phase – Project Communication Plan (#5 in the series Planning Phase)
By Michele Berrie, Queensland University of Technology

A separate communication plan may be provided, using the Communication Plan template1, as appropriate. The template comprises tables for training strategies, and marketing and communication strategies. A well-developed and comprehensive Communication Plan using both tables meets the change management needs for most projects. Keep in mind that managing change is required in all projects to some degree because change is embedded in all projects.

Communication is a critical component of every project plan because it provides the vital link between the project, the client and success. When developing a communication plan it is essential to answer the following questions:

  • Who will be impacted by this project?
  • What type of change does this project represent, is it only going to affect one department, or the entire organization?
  • When is this change scheduled to occur?
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Planning Phase – Risk Management Plan

Planning Phase – Risk Management Plan (#3 in the series Planning Phase)
By Michele Berrie, Queensland University of Technology

Projects are by their nature dynamic and risks, as well as their ratings, will change as the project progresses. New risks, unidentified in the early stages, often emerge over time. Therefore, the project manager should review the Risk Management Plan (RMP) regularly and make changes and additions. The evolving RMP through the execution of a major project should be included as part of steering committee meeting papers. For all projects, a review of high risks, otherwise notable risks and changed risks should be specified in the Project Status Report.

A typical overview of the Risk Management Process outlined by the RMP is as follows:

  1. Establish the context: start the risk management process with a clear understanding of the operating environment. In establishing the context it is essential to identify and scope all influences (internal and external) which may reasonably impact your organization.
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Planning Phase – Project Plan and The Work Breakdown Structure

Planning Phase – Project Plan and The Work Breakdown Structure (#2 in the series Planning Phase)
By Michele Berrie, Queensland University of Technology

Project Plan

The Project Plan is a document that describes and brings together the components of a project. In effect, the Project Plan is the guidebook for all to the project. All aspects of the project should be covered, although the level of detail depends on the size of the project.

Work Breakdown Structure

The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) is a foundation document in project management and all projects should contain at least a high level WBS that shows the main project products or phases with the main tasks. Then, the WBS can provide the basis for planning and managing the key areas of the project. Risks and costs may be referenced against the WBS, as well as time frames and milestones.

Project plans for larger projects should develop multi-level WBSs. Read the Complete Article

Planning Phase – Introduction

Planning Phase – Introduction (#1 in the series Planning Phase)
By Michele Berrie, Queensland University of Technology

Definition: defining and refining objectives.

This phase requires completion of a Project Plan. A Work Breakdown Structure and sub-plans are part of the Project Plan. The sub-plans may be incorporated into the main Project Plan or may be separate, depending on the scope and value of the project:

  • Work Breakdown Structure diagram or Gantt chart
  • Risk Management Plan
  • Quality Plan
  • Communication Plan

The Project Plan is a dynamic document that supplies an integrated suite of information to coordinate, run and control the project. The level of detail depends on the size of the project and impacts outside the local area. The project manager should always bear in mind that an overly long plan may contain so much detail that the documentation will never be read.

The project manager will practise a wide range of skills, including technical, communications, human resource and political to prepare the plan. Read the Complete Article

Recommended PM App

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