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Project Management – Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis

Project Management – Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis
By Timber Chinn, Northwest University

Once project risks are identified, they must be analyzed to determine how likely they are to actually happen and what impact they would have on the project. Qualitative risk analysis means assigning each risk a subjective factor related to how probable it is that the risk will occur and the level of impact that the risk would have if it did occur. The process is easy, quick and inexpensive. More extensive analysis can be accomplished through quantitative analysis which is described later in this book.

All risks are not equal, so qualifying them helps the project manager determine which risks require action, which should be closely monitored, and which can be ignored.For example, a human resources department tasked with hiring 20 highly-skilled employees in a two-month period of time faces several risks. One risk is that the hiring team will not be able to find enough candidates to fill the positions. Read the Complete Article

How to Project Manage a Pyramid

A few days ago Timber Chinn posted a nice article entitled “The History of Project Management“.

In it, Timber traces the origins of modern day project management back to the construction of the Great Pyramid of Giza around 2,500 BC, and questions whether today’s project managers would be able to achieve the same feat by applying modern methods.

Timber has a point. Even by today’s standards, there’s no doubting what the ancients Egyptians achieved with the construction of the great pyramid. It was the tallest building in the world for over 4,000 years, until 1874, and to this day it remains the most massive building on the planet.

We’re still building pyramids, today. The Shard in London is the latest and also pretty impressive:

  • Western Europe’s tallest building (for now, at least)
  • 72 floors serviced by 44 lifts
  • Its construction materials are 95% recyclable

It also has a rather exclusive bathroom (or toilet, if you’re British) with an unrivaled view of London on the 68th floor. Read the Complete Article

Project Management – Organizational Influences

Project Management – Organizational Influences
By Timber Chinn, Northwest University

Organizational influences directly affect a project’s success—either positively or negatively. These influences include the organization’s culture, its structure and its general style. Although organizational influences fall under the umbrella of enterprise environmental factors, it is important to grasp their unique importance to a project. One of the first things a project manager must consider is the organization’s culture; those beliefs, values and traditions that define the organization’s members and how they work. Culture is an important consideration because it alone can determine the success of a project. For example, if a stakeholder of a conservative organization wants to implement a radical new program, the project manager must take this into consideration before starting the project. In this case it is highly likely that the project will meet with resistance, so one of the project manager’s most important tasks is to tightly nail down the scope of work and expected deliverables. Read the Complete Article

The History of Project Management

The History of Project Management
By Timber Chinn, Northwest University

The specific discipline of project management began in the 20th Century, but project management has existed since the beginning of time. At its most basic, a project is something done once to accomplish a particular task in a specific period of time. People have always managed projects in order to build a home, launch a war, or move supplies from one place to another—all tasks done once in a set period of time. Mankind’s most awe-inspiring achievements throughout history were built using some form of the five standard project management process groups (initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing).

One of the first examples of such a project is the Giza Pyramid, one of the Seven Wonders of the World. The Egyptians built this massive structure in about 20 years, from approximately 2580-2560 B.C. Archeologists believe that the Egyptians used highly-developed project management tools and concepts to achieve this success (Kozak-Holland, 2012, n. Read the Complete Article

Performance Reporting in Project Management – Some Best Practices

Performance Reporting in Project Management – Some Best Practices
By Timber Chinn, Northwest University

Project work requires ongoing measurements and evaluations to make sure everything is on track with schedule, budget and objectives. It is the project manager’s responsibility to use these measurements and evaluations to report how the project is doing compared to the performance baseline. There may be many different audiences to whom the project manager reports, and many different formats. For instance, the project sponsor may require weekly updating with a broad-brush overview of the project, whereas the project team may need daily updates with details about each work package.

The size and complexity of the project, as well as the preferences of the project manager, team and stakeholders, will determine the type and frequency of performance reporting. However, it can be challenging for parties to agree on how they want to receive performance reports, particularly if they do not understand their options. Read the Complete Article

Recommended PM App

Recommended PM App

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