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Infographic: Technical Certification + PMP = Higher Salary

Infographic: Technical Certification + PMP = Higher Salary
By Global Knowledge

Respondents to Global Knowledge’s 2014 IT Salary and Skills Survey reported that adding Project Management Professional (PMP) certification to their technical certification gave their average salary a bump. Below is the infographic:

The PMP Salary Bump

Figure 1: The PMP Salary Bump

This article was originally published in Global Knowledge’s Business Brief e-newsletter. Global Knowledge delivers comprehensive hands-on project management, business process, and professional skills training. Visit our online Knowledge Center at www.globalknowledge.com/business for free white papers, webinars, and more.

© Copyright 2014, Global Knowledge. All rights reserved. Read the Complete Article

PM and BA Roles in Requirements and Project Communication

PM and BA Roles in Requirements and Project Communication
By Dan Stober, PMP, Global Knowledge

Communication is vital within projects and contributes significantly to project success.

Project managers (PMs) know that they have to construct a robust communication management plan for the overall project. The communication management plan should be designed in such a manner that it defines how project information will be handled: how the project team collects, generates, stores, distributes, and disposes of project information. Considerations will include who gets what information, when, why, in what format, and how and where project information will be archived.

For the business analyst (BA), communication management revolves around communicating requirements, which A Guide to the Business Analysis Body of Knowledge (BABOK® Guide) v2.0 states, “is essential for bringing stakeholders to a common understanding of requirements.” Of the primary underlying competencies of the trained BA, a thorough understanding of verbal communications, teaching skills, and written communications is among the most essential. Read the Complete Article

Four Axioms for Controlling Change

Four Axioms for Controlling Change
By Samuel T. Brown, III, PMP, Global Knowledge Course Director and Instructor

Change is a constant in life and certainly a constant challenge in project management.

Our customers don’t know what they don’t know, and so they routinely ask for something more or different. Our teams are comprised of talented, creative people who often recognize opportunities for improvement of either the project’s deliverables or the processes agreed to for producing those deliverables.

The problem is that the team is so intimately involved with the work of the project that they often make changes without recognizing that they have done so.

Of course, there are also the changes that are driven by evolving business objectives, new constraints from regulations, the marketplace, etc. With change impacting the project from all of these sources, both on a requested and on a discovered basis, how can a project manager possibly expect to control anything? Read the Complete Article

Three Types of Metrics Defined by ITIL

Three Types of Metrics Defined by ITIL
By Michael Scarborough

An important aspect described in the ITIL Continual Service Improvement book involves the various types of metrics that ITIL recommends and how they are used. The three types of metrics ITIL identifies are technology, process, and service. In this post, I will describe these three types of metrics and provide some examples of each.

  1. Technology Metrics

    Technology metrics measure specific aspects of the IT infrastructure and equipment. In most IT organizations, we are somewhat overwhelmed with the availability of various technology metrics. Some example technology metrics include:

    • CPU utilization of a server
    • Amount of disk space utilized

    • Speed of a network interface

    While technology metrics are abundant, they only provide information about a small piece of the service management environment and potentially only supply information about a tiny technical aspect of a service.

  2. Process Metrics

    Process metrics measure some specific aspect of a process.

Read the Complete Article

Working in a Matrix Organization – Keys to Success

Working in a Matrix Organization – Keys to Success
By Michelle Moore, , Global Knowledge Course Instructor

As organizations look to do more with fewer resources and leverage scarce knowledge better across their entire organization, we see lots of companies moving to matrix structures. A matrix structure can be defined as “a mixed organizational form in which normal hierarchy is overlaid by some form of lateral authority or influence resulting in two chains of command – one along functional lines and the other along project lines.”

There is no question that a matrix structure can offer a significant number of benefits including a more efficient usage of resources and standardisation of processes/working practices across different implementations. The challenge is that working in a matrix organization requires new skills and competencies to ensure that the planned benefits of the matrix are realized as intended.

To work effectively as a functional resource manager or as a project manager in a matrix structure, leaders need:

  • Organizational Thinking – this can be defined as having a deep understanding of the formal organization (e.g., goals, roles, processes, etc..) and the informal organization (e.g., politics, informal processes, power, etc…) and applying that knowledge to make all decisions.
Read the Complete Article

Military Orders Process vs. Project Management Methodology

Military Orders Process vs. Project Management Methodology
By Daniel Stober, Global Knowledge Course Director and Instructor

Round 1: Receiving and Analyzing the Mission

For a project manager (PM) who has served as a military officer on a battalion or higher staff, the parallels between the military decision-making process (MDMP), the orders production process, and project management doctrine prescribed by the Project Management Institute (PMI) are difficult to ignore. Both the MDMP and the processes outlined in A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge—Fifth Edition (PMBOK® Guide) are iterative in nature, allow for the introduction of changes to the original plan, assign tasks and responsibilities, and involve the concept of managing the scope of the operation or project.

The project management plan’s sub-plans, such as the communications management plan, risk management plan, and configuration management plan, are not unlike the annexes, tabs, and appendixes produced to supplement a military operations order. Read the Complete Article

The Business Process Analysis for a Project Manager

The Business Process Analysis for a Project Manager
By James SwansonGlobal Knowledge Course Director

Enterprises, whether they are commercial, non-profit, or government entities, are operational organizations that operate through the execution of hundreds of processes. The quality of these processes affects every aspect of the enterprise and these processes are rarely static. Business Process Analysis (BPA) is the discipline of examining processes so that they may be changed to align with enterprise objectives.

There are a number of reasons why PMs, in particular, must understand the BPA discipline. Project Management is a discipline full of processes that are targets for improvement. Also many projects originate from BPA, and the project implements the improvements, or the BPA is the project itself. This series of posts will explain BPA and why it is important to Project Managers.

What Is a Quality Process?

Most PMs are familiar with the traditional characteristics of a project. Read the Complete Article

Controlling Schedule and Cost with Project Baselines

Controlling Schedule and Cost with Project Baselines
By Bill Scott, Global Knowledge Course Director and Instructor

Stakeholders measure projects by how well they are executed within the project constraints or baselines. A baseline is an approved plan for a portion of a project (+/- changes). It is used to compare actual performance to planned performance and to determine if project performance is within acceptable guidelines. Every project has at least four project baselines. There may be others, depending on the project and definitions used.

Project Baselines

  • Budget
  • Schedule
  • Scope
  • Quality

Schedule and Budget are the focus of this paper and the terms activity and work elements are synonymous. Schedule and cost (budget) are two of the major legs of the project constraint polygon. Without the schedule and budget baselines plans, one does not know where the project stands relative to planned schedule progress or planned budget performance. The schedule and budget baselines, along with other baselines, are developed in the planning phase of the project. Read the Complete Article

What Are the Contents of a Business Case?

What Are the Contents of a Business Case?
By James SwansonGlobal Knowledge Course Director

An effective way to consider what should be contained in a business case is to think like the decision makers. Put yourself in their shoes and imagine you were being held accountable for selecting the best investments for your enterprise. You would probably include the following information:

Executive Summary

This is the leading section in a business case, but the last part written containing the concise summary of the business case main points which are elaborated in the other sections.

Why Consider This Project?

All projects must pass a certain test before they are selected for the portfolio. As compelling as the project appears, it doesn’t belong in the portfolio if it can’t be aligned with the enterprise high-level business objectives. These objectives are the directives given by the business leaders to guide business decisions. Read the Complete Article

How to Apply Knowledge Management to Project Management

How to Apply Knowledge Management to Project Management
By Stephanie SimonGlobal Knowledge

Knowledge Management examines how we acquire, organize, manage, share, and utilize knowledge and information. The Internet gives us an overwhelming amount of information on a daily basis — and the volume of information available is growing rapidly! One of the biggest challenges for individuals and organizations involved in project management is to make the best use of this knowledge and information so they can operate more efficiently, improve decision making, and sustain a competitive advantage.

What Is Knowledge Management?

Simply put, it is how information is converted into knowledge that is an asset to the organization. We learn from each project we complete, but without management support and knowledge management tools and processes in place, this knowledge is routinely lost during the project lifecycle, and it may take a cultural shift to recognize the strategic importance and value of knowledge and information. Read the Complete Article

Recommended PM App

Recommended PM App

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