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Project Implementation – Training

Project Implementation – Training (#53 in the Hut A Project Management Primer)
By Nick Jenkins

Simply dumping your product or system on an unprepared support team will not be appreciated. The people who are to support your finalised project need to be trained and prepared to do their job properly. As usual the scale of this training will vary with the scale of your project.

At the bottom end of the scale, provision of user manuals and support manuals will be adequate. If your product or system is not very complicated then that may be sufficient. More complicated products might require specific training guides and support material, such as tutorials or simulations to get the support team up to speed. At the top end of the training rung you might want to consider full blown training presentations and accreditation for support analysts.

Also consider using members of your project team to train support analysts. Read the Complete Article

Project Implementation – Maintenance and Upgrades

Project Implementation – Maintenance and Upgrades (#52 in the Hut A Project Management Primer)
By Nick Jenkins

If your project has any permanency whatsoever it will require maintenance and possible upgrades. While you will have done your level best to provide for all the users’ requirements, those requirements will evolve over time and your product must evolve with them.

An important part of the maintainability is to make your project, design documentation and supporting material available as an important reference for those that follow in your footsteps. If they are to successfully implement changes within your system to cope with the future needs of users they must understand your thinking.

Scheduling Upgrades

Upgrades are always necessary. You can either ignore them or plan for them ahead of time. If you acknowledge an upgrade or maintenance release will be necessary then you can plan one, say three months from the initial launch of your project. Read the Complete Article

Project Implementation – Positive Perception

Project Implementation – Positive Perception (#51 in the Hut A Project Management Primer)
By Nick Jenkins

Most technical people are poor at the public relations side of business. Communications and marketing is generally not our strong point. But no matter how much we might like to think differently, people base decisions upon perceptions. Your project needs to create a positive perception as much as it needs to create a positive result.

To this end you need to capitalise on the successful delivery of your project and put together a “golive” launch that suitably dazzles your intended audience. This might not be a black tie event with flowing champagne and a marching band, but there should be some event that punctuates the launch of your project. This is also a good way to reward your project team and underscore your appreciation for all the hard work. At the very, very least you should launch your project with a general announcement like an email to all the stakeholders. Read the Complete Article

The Six Phases Of Project Management – Implementation Phase

The Six Phases Of Project Management – Implementation Phase (#7 in the Hut Project Management Handbook)
By Wouter Baars

The project takes shape during the implementation phase. This phase involves the construction of the actual project result. Programmers are occupied with encoding, designers are involved in developing graphic material, contractors are building, the actual reorganisation takes place. It is during this phase that the project becomes visible to outsiders, to whom it may appear that the project has just begun. The implementation phase is the ‘doing’ phase, and it is important to maintain the momentum.

In one project, it had escaped the project team’s attention that one of the most important team members was expecting to become a father at any moment and would thereafter be completely unavailable for about a month. When the time came, an external specialist was brought in to take over his work, in order to keep the team from grinding to a halt. Read the Complete Article

Project Implementation – Release Control

Project Implementation – Release Control (#50 in the Hut A Project Management Primer)
By Nick Jenkins

When you release a product ‘into the wild’ you will need to know what you released, to whom and when. This may seem trivial but you’ll want to keep track of things so you can make fixes and changes as the customer discovers problems (and they will!).

These are the things you typically need to track for each release :

  • The version number or identifier of the release
  • The date and time of the release
  • The purpose of the release (maintenance, bug fix, testing etc)
  • For each component within the release
    • the name and version number of the component
    • the date it was last modified

Here is an example :

Release Control Example

Release Control Example

Next in the Hut A Project Management Primer:

Project Implementation – Positive Perception

Previously in the Hut A Project Management Primer:

Project Implementation – Acceptance Testing

Nick Jenkins is an IT manager with 10 years experience in software development, project management and software testing. Read the Complete Article

Implementation – Introduction

Implementation – Introduction (#48 in the Hut A Project Management Primer)
By Nick Jenkins

Hang on a minute, you’re not finished yet!

Okay, the project’s ready, development has finished and it’s been thoroughly tested. But you still have to roll it out to a client who’s going to use it in anger. This is the heart-in-the-mouth time when all your hard work is really put to the test.

Prior to launch you have a (relatively short) period to ensure that everything is ready to go and the your project is in a fit state to be released. Leading up to the launch you’ll want to do some final testing and plan the release of the product into the live environment where it is to be used. A strong methodical process is important at this point so that you avoid any last minute hitches.

Next in the Hut A Project Management Primer:

Project Implementation – Acceptance Testing

Previously in the Hut A Project Management Primer:

Building a Team in Project Management

Nick Jenkins is an IT manager with 10 years experience in software development, project management and software testing. Read the Complete Article

The Phased Approach to Project Management Implementation

The Phased Approach to Project Management Implementation
By Thomas P. Stevens

If you are thinking about using a project management consulting company to assist your organization with implementing a Project Management Office (PMO), there are a couple of important factors that you should consider when choosing the right firm.

Implementing a PMO can present significant challenges. For that reason, a phased approach to PMO implementation is not only crucial but also a distinguishing characteristic of successful project management consulting firms. Experienced project management consultants know that a phased approach: (1) helps to overcome resistance to change, (2) allows for lessons learned in early phases to be incorporated in systems installed in later phases and (3) establishes a solid foundation of available project-level data prior to rolling-up enterprise-level information.

Second, successful project management consultants also know that, when it comes to designing a PMO, there is no such thing as a “universal solution.” To be effective, a PMO must be tailored to your organization’s project types, management/staff capabilities, and organizational culture. Read the Complete Article

What is Executing Process Group?

What is Executing Process Group?
By Sivaraj Dhanasekaran

In layman term, the Executing process group is the place where all the project works are taking place. It involves in carrying out all the works which are planned during the Planning process group.

PMBOK 3 definition is as follows:

The Executing process group is the place where the PM putting the project management plan into action mode and makes things really happening. PM works with project team to acheive the project objectives. It tracks the the project plan to ensure the future execution of project plans stays in line with project objectives. The Executing process group will utilize the most project time and resources, and as a result, costs are usually highest during the Executing process. PMs faces more conflicts, issues in this process group.

Objectives

The objectives of the Executing the Project domain are as follows:

  1. Execute Tasks Defined in Project Plan
  2. Ensure Common Understanding and Set Expectations
  3. Implement the Procurement of Project Resources
  4. Manage Resource Allocation
  5. Implement Quality Management Plan
  6. Implement Approved Changes
  7. Implement Approved Actions and Workarounds
  8. Improve Team Performance

Knowledge Areas & Processes

Knowledge Areas Processes
Integration
  1. Direct and Manage Project Execution
Quality
  1. Perform Quality Assurance
Human Resource Management
  1. Acquire Project Team
  2. Develop Project Team
Communication
  1. Information Distribution
Procurement
  1. Request Seller Responses
  2. Select Sellers

Dhanasekaran, Sivaraj is a certified PMP and works as a Senior Project Manager in one of the leading MNC banks in Singapore. Read the Complete Article

Duties of the Project Manager During the Implementing Phase

Duties of the Project Manager During the Implementing Phase
By John Filicetti

  • Ensure Client notifies end-users of all deployment dates.
  • Creates Project Status Report on a regular basis, distributes the report to stakeholders, and posts the report to the project workspace.
  • PM assigns tasks to resources and gathers information from the team when updates are made. PM approves all work and reviews/manages project schedule updates. (Note: It is a good idea to go over weekly tasks with team on Monday and have review of week with team on Friday.)
  • PM meets with other PMs and Resource Managers to review resource allocation and utilization.

  • PM chairs all Status Meetings:
    • PM fills out Meeting Report for all meetings and distributes to team as agenda prior to meeting along with current RAIDCBT and Project Schedule.
    • PM updates Meeting Report with minutes during meeting and distributes to Client PM and project team.
    • Discuss week’s goals.
Read the Complete Article

Project Management Process – Phase 3 – Implementing – Transition to Support

Project Management Process – Phase 3 – Implementing – Transition to Support (#25 in the Hut Project Management Process) By John Filicetti

Description

The accepted project deliverable can now be transitioned to the support or maintenance team and project documents can be released to the support team by the customer for reference following the Support Transition Plan.

Steps

  • Prepare Support Transition Plan
  • Transition solution to support organization
  • Customer will provide all necessary documentation to support team

Templates

  • Support Transition Plan (Created by Project Manager and Customer)

Responsibilities

  • Project Manager with Project Team and Customer Team

Next in the Hut Project Management Process:

Project Management Process – Phase 4 – Closing Overview

Previously in the Hut Project Management Process:

Project Management Process – Phase 3 – Implementing – Deploy Solution

John F. Filicetti, PMP, MBA
John Filicetti is a Sr. Sales Engineer/PM-PMO-PPM Consultant with a great depth of experience and expertise in enterprise project management, project management methodologies, Project Portfolio Management (PPM), Project Management Offices (PMOs), Governance, process consulting, and business management. Read the Complete Article

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