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Risk Management for Project Managers

Risk Management for Project Managers
By Michelle Symonds

Every project has potential risks that could cause things to go horribly wrong. You need to be aware what the risks are and have contingency plans to avoid the project being a complete failure.

How to Identify the Risks

Risk management is at the heart and soul of project management, and failing to practice it can have bad effects on the project. The effort put in at the beginning to help be prepared for the risks before they happen is the best way to avoid them, and ensure the success of the project. The benefits of risk management are huge, providing you deal with uncertainties proactively.

To identify the risks you need to keep an open mind and focus on scenarios that might happen in the future. Talk to team members; find out what experiences they have had on this type of project in the past. Read the Complete Article

Project Management: The Basics

Project Management: The Basics
By Michelle Symonds

A successful project manager will initiate a project by creating a plan right at the start of the project, which will save time, money and many problems.

The Aim of the Project

There are two things the project manager needs to know right at the outset. Firstly who they are working for, and secondly what the aims of the project are. The easiest way to achieve both is to communicate with the client, and find out exactly what they expect from the project, what their needs are and how much importance they put on each area. If there is more than one it is important to communicate with them all, as they may have differing views on the same item, and it’s important you know all viewpoints.

The Tasks Within the Project

As the plan progresses all the tasks must be organized in order of priority. Read the Complete Article

Why Do a Project?

Why Do a Project?
By Jason Rich, Northwest University

Simply put, we do projects to achieve a result that we would not be able to get otherwise. Using ongoing operations we can build thousands of iPhone 8’s, but we could never create the iPhone 9. Using ongoing operations we can build all the Boeing 777’s we like but we could never build the 787. In short we use projects to push us forward and meet needs.

Every product that you use on a regular basis, from your toothbrush to the gas in your car is available to you because a project was done to design it, or determine how to get it. Or, in the case of your gas, several projects were done to get it, refine it, and ship it. There were countless more projects done to create the tools that were used in all of those projects. Projects are so ingrained in our culture and lives that it is some times hard to see them. Read the Complete Article

Project Management Basics Not To Be Overlooked

Project Management Basics Not To Be Overlooked
By Robert Kelly

What you may not know is that there is some basic project management knowledge and terminology that is very useful when working with other certified Project Management Professionals. Having some basic project management knowledge is worth it. It might even help you become better organized and lead you to yet another promotion.

Basic Blocking and Tackling

Let’s cover some basic blocking and tackling of project management. If you read my last post, Winning Takes Care of Everything, you know I am not a fan of process for process sake. I do, however, believe in the necessity for project frameworks and understand there are a few key elements (tools, processes, techniques) that project managers must leverage to repeatedly deliver successful projects.

Specifically, I want to cover the Work Breakdown Structure, the Project Schedule, and the Project Plan. Many project managers use these incorrectly and interchangeably when they should not. Read the Complete Article

What Is a Project Management Methodology

What Is a Project Management Methodology
By Cora Systems

Modern project management is said to have begun in the 1950s when there was a drive to organise work into projects and communicate this work across a number of teams and departments. As time has moved on the means and best practice of managing projects has grown.

The lifecycle of a project tends to run over the following headings:

  • Initiation
  • Planning/ Designing
  • Execution
  • Control
  • Close

What is a Project Management Methodology?

A project management methodology is a series of repeatable methods, processes and best practices that should be followed by project managers when managing a project in order to deliver a higher rate of success. Methodologies provide project managers with a roadmap of key deliverables to ensure no tasks are missed during the course of the project. It also guarantees that the rest of the project team are reading from the same hymn sheet. Read the Complete Article

A Phase by Any Other Name: The 5 Project Phases

A Phase by Any Other Name: The 5 Project Phases
By Shelley Brodie

Note: This article was slightly edited by PM Hut.

While there are a few different schools of thought on how to manage a project, the one thing all agree on is the fact all projects will go through certain phases before it’s done.

Typically, a project will move through 5 phases with the length of time spent in each phase influenced and impacted by the size and nature of the project.

The project phases are:

Initiation → Planning → Executing → Controlling → Closing

  • Phase 1 – Initiation is exactly what it sounds like, getting the project started and it’s in this phase where the decisions on the direction the project takes are made. This is also the phase were we get our Project Scope Statement from…a literal statement of what we intend to do, not do and accomplish with the project.
Read the Complete Article

Project Management Objectives

Project Management Objectives
By James Clements

Project Management Objectives are not the same for every project or program, unlike Project Manager/Management Responsibilities which indeed you could generalize for all projects and I think some may confuse these two terms.

Project Management Objectives are the specific objectives that the project sets out to achieve. They are objectives that satisfy both the client needs and requirements and your organization/teams reason for doing the project. This latter point being very important because while we want to fully satisfy our client, projects are a vehicle for driving business strategy and these strategic objectives need to be defined, communicated and their achievement measured.

Each project should have Primary and Secondary objectives. Projects can only have one Primary Objective, usually where you address the client requirements, however there can been multiple secondary objectives and this is where you can state what you want to achieve from the project. Read the Complete Article

The 5 Project Management Process Groups: A Quick Introduction

The 5 Project Management Process Groups: A Quick Introduction
By Mary Walterhouse

Note from PM Hut: This post is for absolute beginners in Project Management.

If you are aspiring to take your PMP Certification, you should know that if there is one single page that you really have to memorize, that is the page 42.

That page of PMBOK shows the mapping of the Project Management Process Groups and Knowledge Areas.

There are 5 Process Groups that have clear dependencies and are followed in sequence.

  1. Initiating process group: When the project is officially started.
  2. Planning process group: Remember the project plan? you do it here together with your sub-plans.

  3. Executing process group: This is it, start working on what was in your plan.

  4. Monitoring and Controlling process group: You make a plan because you plan to succeed, and this is where you cross check if you are on the right track based on your plan.

  5. Read the Complete Article

    What Is Project Management and Why Is It Different?

    What Is Project Management and Why Is It Different?
    By Glen D. Ford

    Project management is always showing up in the business media today. It seems that every few months, something hits the news that has to do with project management. Maybe it’s a demand that every business should have a PMO. Or maybe, another major project that has hit major overruns because of poor project management.

    But what is project management? And how does it differ from any other type of management? What makes it special? How will it affect me as an entrepreneur and business leader? Why is it so important?

    In this article, I’m going to explain what project management is and why it is different from regular management. I’m going to use strategic project management to illustrate the differences. Operational project management uses the same tools and techniques, and acts under the same conditions. However, the difference between an operational group and a project group is a little less obvious. Read the Complete Article

    What Is a PMO?

    What Is a PMO?
    By Glen D. Ford

    If you’ve been listening to the business or technical articles for the last ten years, then you’ve probably heard the demand that your company institute a PMO. It seems everyone from major banks to little manufacturing companies have been jumping on the PMO bandwagon.

    But what is a PMO?

    The simplest answer comes from expanding the letters of the acronym PMO into a set of words. A PMO is a Project Management Office. But of course, that doesn’t really explain what a PMO is or why an organization or business might want one.

    There are as many different types of PMOs as there are companies. The structure, purpose and organizational level of a PMO will change depending on the needs of the organization. And of course, the opinions of the management.

    All PMOs have one thing in common. They are focused on the skill set or profession of project management. Read the Complete Article

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