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Five Steps to Quality Management of Your Project

Five Steps to Quality Management of Your Project
By Michelle Symonds

Producing a high quality project depends on many factors, and maintaining control over quality whilst also sticking to timescales and budget is a challenge every project manager has to face. Knowing how to control the quality of your project from the outset is critical in achieving excellence, so with that in mind, these five steps will help you to produce high quality projects time after time.

  • Step 1: Make a robust project plan

    Before you start anything, you must implement a well thought out project plan. How you achieve this will depend on your own style of project management, but the key factor is to ensure you have included all deliverables, timescales and budgets in your project plan, and also built in some room for manoeuvre. Project plans are not static documents, and need to be refined and revised as the project opens out, so work to a cycle of Plan, Do, Check and Act to ensure your project plan is flexible.

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Future Trends in Quality Management

Future Trends in Quality Management
By Michael Stanleigh

Where is quality management going in the next decade? Being able to look at current trends and see where they will take us is an interesting and thought provoking exercise. It can give us a much needed competitive edge to move ahead of the pack.

Through our continuous, extensive global research studies we have identified a number of key trends that will have a positive impact on organizations and how they manage quality initiatives over the next decade.

Here are 8 trends you can expect to see happen that will help you gain organizational momentum:

  1. Quality Management is not dead – it continues to evolve

    Quality Management never really died. It evolved. Rather than being relegated as a position title or a department, it has been infused into the way everyone works in every single position within their organizations. Quality is about products and services.

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When and Why Does Total Quality Management Work, and Why Isn’t It Still Prevalent?

When and Why Does Total Quality Management Work, and Why Isn’t It Still Prevalent?
By Timothy Prosser

Total Quality Management, or TQM, was prevalent in business thinking in the 1980s, and improved the work lives and productivity of many people as well as the fortunes of some major corporations in that era. I won’t try to describe how to implement Total Quality Management here, as there are a great many publications on the topic. I will instead describe the most important and fundamental elements I believe an organization needs to achieve the full benefits of TQM, and discuss why I think it fell into disuse.

TQM is much more than just a tool set, which is an important part of why it works. TQM isn’t just a set of statistical tools and practices, though it includes them. It works best when its philosophical base is understood and supported, and when that understanding and support come from the top of the organization. Read the Complete Article

Quality Objectives in Project Management – Beauty is in The Eye of the Beholder!

Quality Objectives in Project Management – Beauty is in The Eye of the Beholder!
By James Clements

I went to a Project Management group breakfast a couple of weeks ago and as part of the presentation, one of the speakers asked the group, “Who derives the benefit from a Project to build an Apartment Building?”

There were a few different answers, but his was unequivocally “The Tenant”. He advocated that as the end user of the apartments, the tenant should be the main focus for the Project Management Team and that ultimately, all project decisions should focus on this desired outcome.

I couldn’t help myself, I had to disagree, and in this blog post want to explore this a bit further.

Firstly, I do not disagree that the “The Tenant” does not derive benefit from the project, my problem with his answer is that it was too simplistic, and if he were the Project Manager for the Developer or the General Contractor sure to find himself under scrutiny. Read the Complete Article

The Business Process Analysis for a Project Manager

The Business Process Analysis for a Project Manager
By James SwansonGlobal Knowledge Course Director

Enterprises, whether they are commercial, non-profit, or government entities, are operational organizations that operate through the execution of hundreds of processes. The quality of these processes affects every aspect of the enterprise and these processes are rarely static. Business Process Analysis (BPA) is the discipline of examining processes so that they may be changed to align with enterprise objectives.

There are a number of reasons why PMs, in particular, must understand the BPA discipline. Project Management is a discipline full of processes that are targets for improvement. Also many projects originate from BPA, and the project implements the improvements, or the BPA is the project itself. This series of posts will explain BPA and why it is important to Project Managers.

What Is a Quality Process?

Most PMs are familiar with the traditional characteristics of a project. Read the Complete Article

Quality Management on Software Projects

Quality Management on Software Projects
By Dave Nielsen

This is the first in a series of articles about managing the Quality related activities in a software project, written from the project manager’s perspective. The first step the project manager will take should be to plan the Quality activities that are required for the application, web site, or system to meet its goals and objectives. You may need to document the goals, objectives, roles, responsibilities, and other details in a formal Quality Management Plan depending on the size and complexity of your project. If your project is not large or complex enough to require a formal plan, scheduling the work and assigning it to a resource in your WBS may be sufficient.

There are 3 different phases or types of testing required during the build phase of the project:

  1. strongDeveloper testing – this is testing that will be done by the developers on the team and will include unit testing, function testing, thread testing, integration testing, and system testing.
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23 Questions a Quality Auditor May Ask

23 Questions a Quality Auditor May Ask
By Zenkara

When an ISO9001 audit is on the horizon for your company, it’s a good idea to ensure your staff are able to answer the following questions. (although some questions are more for management and the QA team)

  1. What are your documented quality policy and objectives?
  2. How are quality objectives established at various levels through the organisation?
  3. How are quality objectives measured, communicated?
  4. How does the quality policy relate to you and your job?
  5. How does your management show commitment to quality?
  6. What is contained in your quality management system? What is it for?
  7. Do you use procedures? Are they ever updated?
  8. What sort of training have you undertaken?
  9. What records are kept of management reviews?
  10. How does top management ensure availability of resources?
  11. How does top management establish continual improvement?
  12. What metrics are recorded? Do you know the key metrics results?
  13. How are customer requirements and regulatory requirements communicated and met?
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The Intangible Costs of Quality

The Intangible Costs of Quality
By Michael Donahoe

“Nobody tries to do a bad job. Sometimes we just do.”

There are many ways to measure the cost of quality on your projects. There are the costs of conformance, being preventative costs and appraisal costs. There are also the more well known, being the costs of non-conformance. Non-conforming costs are broken down into internal failure costs and external failure costs. These costs are very well studied and there are many books written about them. I’d like to review them and in doing so provide you with a more hidden value that I call the intangible costs of quality.

First let’s discuss the cost of conformance: preventative and appraisal costs.

    Prevention costs – These are costs incurred by the actions of training, risk assessments, and the creation of process and system controls. These actions all lead to the ever so brilliant mantra of quality, “Do it right the first time and you never have to go back.”

    Everything about prevention costs are relatively intangible to some degree.

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Quality Management Strategy

Quality Management Strategy
By The Office of Government Commerce – OGC, UK

Purpose

  • Quality Management recognise a number of management principles that can be used by senior management as a framework to guide their organisations towards improved performance. The principles cover: customer focus, leadership, involvement of people, process approach, system approach to management, continual improvement, factual approach to decision making, and mutually beneficial supplier relationships.
  • Quality Management provides suitable guidance to build upon Quality Assurance standards to achieve business benefits for all stakeholder groups and focuses on continual performance improvement to sustain customer satisfaction. The core concepts are:
  • continuous process improvement – driven by senior management, focused on critical process areas with explicit improvement goals
  • customer focus – recognising both internal and external ‘customers’ and their needs and providing value to the user of the product
  • defect prevention and non-compliance – seeking to prevent non-conformance issues arising with products and services early in the development cycle and being proactively engaged in prevention
  • universal responsibility – recognising that quality is not only the responsibility of quality assurance teams or reviewers, but should be totally pervasive in all aspects of the business, with everyone seeking ways to improve the quality of their own products and services.
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CMM and the PMBOK

CMM and the PMBOK
By Dave Nielsen

CMM or CMMI may be the most prominent quality standards for software. CMM/CMMI goes beyond the scope of standards such as ISO to define the criteria for good software processes, which is what makes the standard so attractive to organizations with IT shops. CMM/CMMI is intended to govern processes of the entire IT organization, and the complete lifecycle of software applications so must include the processes used to govern the development of the software. CMM/CMMI’s influence on processes that govern software development means that it also influences the way that software development projects are managed. PMI’s PMBOK (Project Management Body of Knowledge) is recognized around the world as the bible of project management best practices. These apply to the management of projects in any industry including the IT industry so the best practices of the PMBOK will be influenced by the CMM/CMMI standard in any organization that wishes to apply the two standards. Read the Complete Article

Recommended PM App

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