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The Project Charter – What Should Be Included

The Project Charter – What Should Be Included
By Sue Cochran, Northwest University

When you initially charter a plane, you don’t need to provide a seating chart, or list of names to the airline company. You do, however, need to know approximately how many people will be on the plane, how much the trip will cost and where you are going. The Project Charter is much like that for your project.

The Charter is a document that explains the project in clear concise wording without a lot of detail. It’s written for high level management needs. These people do not need all the detail to understand what the end goal is, how long it will take and how much it will cost them.

The project charter includes:

  • The purpose and objectives of the project in clear, concise language.
  • Requirements of the project, very high level, not much detail here.
  • Project description, a paragraph or two that explains the project.
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A Guide to Escalation in Project Management

A Guide to Escalation in Project Management
By Deepali Bhadade

While most of project management plans or communication management plans have an escalation mechanism defined; in reality, very few project managers make an effective use of the escalation mechanism. Many of them try to avoid escalations in the fear of conflict; some overdo it for every next problem in the project. Both these approaches are harmful for projects. Escalating a project problem at the right time, to the right person with the right amount of information is an art to be cultivated by good project managers. This guide focuses on good practices and tips on effective escalation for project benefit.

Project Escalation

The general meaning of Escalation is: Increase in magnitude or intensity by bypassing the immediate person.

Applied to the project context, escalation is generally a formal process to highlight the issue at hand to a higher authority as per the escalation mechanism defined for the project. Read the Complete Article

Managing Project Expectations

Managing Project Expectations
By Diana Eskander

How to define and organize project scope

Projects range in size, complexity, duration, resources, stakeholders – and that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

Defining the scope of a given project – what the intended result is, and what’s required to bring it to completion – is not only important, it’s necessary.

It creates clarity and accountability, and carves out the path for success. Establishing project scope can prove to be difficult. It requires you to step back and have a global understanding of the project environment and to be analytical.

You have to get intimate with the specific details. There are plenty of elements to take into account in order to scope the main lines of a program or project.

This white paper examines how to define the scope of a project and consequently, how to organize the information in a comprehensive way that can be referred to by all stakeholders, at any time. Read the Complete Article

How to Overcome Your Worst Project Problems

How to Overcome Your Worst Project Problems
By Harry Hall

Allow me to ask you a question. When you face life’s most difficult problems, do you run away from your problems? Successful individuals, groups, and organizations have a habit of running TOWARD their problems, not away from them.

Rather than seeing problems as unwelcome, problem solvers see challenges as opportunities to use their God-given talents and skills to make rich contributions to their organization.

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. – Winston S. Churchill

What are your most significant project problems? Are your project teams making decisions and changing their minds repeatedly? Do you find yourself spending more time reworking things than creating new things? Are your stakeholders constantly changing requirements?

Worry and anxiety are not productive ways to respond to life’s challenges. There is a better approach for solving problems. Read the Complete Article

How to Choose Project Management Software

How to Choose Project Management Software
By Claudia Vandermilt

Trying to manage all the moving pieces of a complex project using pen and paper can prove problematic. In the worst case scenario, deadlines are missed, critical tasks are overlooked and the entire undertaking gets sidelined before it even gets off the ground. That is precisely why project management tools have come into existence to help managers plan out, execute and oversee all aspects of the project management process from beginning to end.

Project management tools are designed to help enable easier oversight of each task involved in a complex project so managers can ensure on-time completion of all related tasks, balanced workloads for staff and sound time management. They are meant to enhance efficiency while ensuring that no detail is left unattended.

Project management software is not all alike, however. Managers seeking to invest in tools to help them better oversee large projects should take four main points into consideration when reviewing the options to determine which tools are suited to their needs:

Planning Abilities

Having the ability to carefully map out an entire project from beginning to end with all required tasks included is the hallmark of a solid project management program. Read the Complete Article

What Is the Silver Lining for Projects?

What Is the Silver Lining for Projects?
By Marge Tam

The proverb “For every cloud there is a silver lining” can be interpreted as for every difficult situation there is some good to it. The proverb is of said to the person that would welcome such an encouragement during trying times, and the person is unable to see any positive way forward.

In the framework of Project Management, the Project Risk Management Process brings the silver lining to the uncertainties that come with managing anything that occurs in the future. Many people tie the word ‘risk’ with the negative connotation. However, according to the PMBOK, there are both negative and positive risks. The negative risk has potential impacts downstream to the overall health of the project projects such as project slip, budget overrun, and unsatisfied customers. While positive risks are essentially opportunities that brings about return on investment, increased revenue and overall process improvements. Read the Complete Article

Project Management Foundations

Project Management Foundations
By Marge Tam

As a professional Project Manager, what would the most fundamental sound advise that one would provide to fellow Project Managers at all different levels – entry level, mid-level, or senior level Project Managers? The key to project success and the fundamental principle that every Project Manager needs to know and practice is the management of the triple constraint, or the iron triangle. This involves Scope, Budget, and Schedule.

In the most simplistic words, imagine the triangle in having three sides for each of the constraint area – Scope, Budget, and Schedule. Every time each side changes, the other two sides have to change as well. We have all heard about the request for project results with the low budget, fast cycle, and highest quality possible. To fulfill one’s professional responsibilities, the Project Management’s role is to gather all the facts on project budget baseline, detailed project scope, and timeline to meet all business and user requirements. Read the Complete Article

Practical Problem Solving

Practical Problem Solving
By Keith MathisPM Expert Live

The ability to solve corporate problems can save a company from strikes, walkouts, lost revenues, worthless setbacks, and numerous other devastating conditions. While we hope that our company never faces any of these, the fact is that they happen daily in companies around the world.

Controlling or preventing these conditions from taking place relates to how one participates in solving problems when they arrive. There is no question as to whether or not problems will come. The question is how and what direction they will appear.

7 Steps to the Successful Problem Solving Process

When a company has a problem, someone is influenced by it. For many it might be the employee; for others it is the customer. Whoever is affected really doesn’t matter. What does matter is how the problem will be examined and solved. Over the next two months, we will look at seven steps to successfully solve problems. Read the Complete Article

Business Analysis Training: The 5 Parts of a Compelling Business Case

Business Analysis Training: The 5 Parts of a Compelling Business Case
By Ben Snyder, CEO of Systemation

You see a problem. You have a solution. You can’t get management to listen. That is, until you mention the resources required, and then they’re listening—and ready to shut you down.

If you want to make headway, you need to learn how to create a compelling business case. Our business analysis training will help you do just that.

The True Cost of Change

“Doing something costs something. Doing nothing costs something. And quite often, doing nothing costs a lot more.” – Ben Feldman

Organizations rely on people who can pinpoint a problem and find a solution, whether it’s an issue with a report, a broken process, a system that not’s delivering as expected, or any other area that needs to be fixed or improved. But they don’t always want to commit the time and resources to make the change. Read the Complete Article

Business Analysis – Part 2

Business Analysis – Part 2
By Keith MathisPM Expert Live

As we continue our look at the Business Analysis knowledge areas, this month we will look at the next two sections: Requirements Management & Communication and Enterprise Analysis.

Requirements Management and Communication

Requirements Management and Communication involves making sure that all stakeholders understand the nature of a solution and agree on the requirements that the solution will meet.

Requirements Management and Communication Tasks

  1. Manage solution scope and requirements – Obtaining and maintaining consensus among key stakeholders regarding the overall solution scope and the requirements that will be implemented is the first step to this knowledge area. All requirements must be assessed to verify that they fall within the solution scope. If additional requirements are invalid, the business analyst must resolve the difference.
  2. Manage requirements traceability – You will now create and maintain relationships between business objectives, requirements, other team deliverables, and solution components to support business analysis or other activities.

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Recommended PM App

Recommended PM App

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