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House of Quality Matrix

House of Quality Matrix
By SmartDraw.com

A House of Quality Matrix is a diagram, whose structure resembles that of a house, which aids in determining how a product is living up to customer needs. Although quite intricate, it is capable of storing a lot of information and comparing large amounts of data.

House of Quality Matrix

Typical Uses

It is best to use house of quality matrix when you are planning on making improvements to an existing product or would like to analyze a products ability to meet customer needs and compare to competition.

Best Practices

  • Identify a product. Choose a product you want to focus your House of Quality Matrix on.
  • Obtain customer opinion. Whether through surveys, opinion polls, or interviews, in order to create this matrix you must know what your customers want. Make sure that you know what they expect or want from your product and how important each aspect is to them.
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How to Undertake a Project Quality Review that will Increase Your Bottom-Line

How to Undertake a Project Quality Review that will Increase Your Bottom-Line
By Michael Stanleigh

A project quality review helps to identify the root causes of problems on a flailing project and provides detailed guidance for how to get it back on track. It has a direct, positive impact on an organization’s bottom-line. When undertaken at the end of a project it provides valuable “lessons” for project teams working on future projects.

In my consulting work in project management I am often called upon to audit projects or undertake project quality reviews of problem projects. Bringing in an outside auditor/consultant to conduct the project quality review is a good practice; it provides project team members and other project stakeholders with the opportunity to be candid and share their opinions and feelings about what is happening or happened on the project without risk of lash back.

The process for conducting a project audit or project quality review is similar regardless of whether one conducts it mid-term on a project or at its conclusion. Read the Complete Article

Why ITIL Can Be Dangerous to Business Relationship Management Health

Why ITIL Can Be Dangerous to Business Relationship Management Health
By Vaughan Merlyn

First, let me be clear—establishing robust Service Management discipline is essential ‘table stakes’ for an IT organization with low supply maturity (i.e., one that is not good at keeping the proverbial ‘lights on and trains running on time.’) If your Business Partners don’t understand or trust basic IT services, they aren’t going to invest their time and energy in developing a strong relationship with the IT organization. They aren’t going to look to that organization for the more strategic and higher value opportunities that might be made possible through information and IT. So, while Service Management is a crucial building block for any IT organization looking to improve their performance and value delivered, it is not the whole story. And ITIL® is an effective framework for establishing good Service Management discipline. However, it does not fully address the more strategic aspects of driving business value realization from information and IT. Read the Complete Article

7 Sharp Ways to Improve Project Quality

7 Sharp Ways to Improve Project Quality
By Harry Hall

A lack of quality management can have profound effects on projects –rework, schedule delays, higher cost, frustration, morale problems, and lack of customer satisfaction. Can project managers afford not to focus on this critical aspect of project management?

I ask in my quality management training sessions, “When buying eyeglasses, what quality aspects are important to you?” I hear comments such as: The glasses fit nicely. The glasses have the features I wanted. I like the style of the glasses.

Other individuals talk about the quality customer experience: how they are greeted, how quickly they see the ophthalmologist, how easy it is to find their frames, and the fast, accurate checkout process.

Projects are similar–project customers, whether internal or external, receive deliverables and encounter project processes. How do your customers describe their deliverables and customer experience? Do your customers feel they are getting remarkable value? Read the Complete Article

Project Scope and the Question of Quality

Project Scope and the Question of Quality
By Ben Snyder, CEO of Systemation

When the subject of project scope comes up, many people immediately think of the features and functions of a product or service, and maybe the results that are expected. But one key aspect that’s often overlooked is the level of quality each of the features and functions requires. A well trained project manager will need to understand the connection between the quality and scope of a project.

Quality is a critical component of project scope, because the cost and amount of resources to deliver the set of specified features and functions will depend on what level of quality is needed. And the quality doesn’t always need to be high.

The simplest example to illustrate this point is a hamburger. By definition, a hamburger is some ground beef between a bun along with maybe some cheese, onions, pickles, and condiments. Read the Complete Article

8 Powerful Ways to Manage Project Quality

8 Powerful Ways to Manage Project Quality
By Harry Hall

“Quality is everyone’s responsibility.” – W. Edwards Deming

When you think of managing the triple constraints of time, budget, and quality, which of these items receives the least focus? I think it’s quality.

Why is quality the red headed step child? Well, it’s hard to manage things we don’t understand. For many project managers, quality seems to be an esoteric concept.

Let’s define quality and discuss some practical ways to manage quality for software projects.

  1. Make quality management pragmatic. Many people do not invest appropriate effort towards quality because they do not understand it. The Project Management Institute defines quality as “conformance to requirements and fitness of use.” According to this definition, quality comes through clearly defining and meeting the requirements of the users and stakeholders.
  2. Plan for quality. We must be intentional about quality. During the planning process, determine how you will manage quality.

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The Quality of Your People Will Dictate The Quality Of Your Business

The Quality of Your People Will Dictate The Quality Of Your Business
By Damien Parker

Many years ago, as a member of The Executive Connection, I had an opportunity to listen to the wisdom of Tony Barnes, the last surviving member of the remarkable J Edwards Deming team which revolutionized Japan after the devastation of the WW2.

Now you’d think that one of the founding fathers of quality control would be cock-a-hoop at the progressions of many of us into such programs. Not so. In fact he believed that “88% of all quality programs in the west had failed”.

Back then, Barnes was somewhat scathing of a system which created a paper warfare simply to get an ISO rating. Barnes’ simple suggestion as to why we have gone wrong was this:

“An inordinate focus on the quality of the product and the processes, rather than on the quality of our people.”

And here are a few other Barnes observations – they were true back then and they still are today:

  • Barnes On Office Systems

    “Don’t make people the slaves of business systems.

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How to Measure Software Quality on a Shoestring – Part 1

How to Measure Software Quality on a Shoestring – Part 1
By Zenkara

I was recently asked “if we were a small company (<50 staff) and we wanted to improve our development activities, what should we measure? Oh, and we don't have a budget". Now the correct approach would be to understand your company's objectives, strategy, culture and particular issue you want to improve. Unfortunately this is often a catch-22 problem. Without a reasonable structure in place, you won't have the data and actions you need to understand what and how to improve. It tends to be the squeaky wheel getting the oil. That said, what can we do? What if we want to "improve generally"? The are some actions that you can do in the short term to help you understand the way things are done:

  • Put together a list of your current projects
  • Put together a list of your current products

  • Estimate the amount of effort that is being spent on fixing things.

  • How long do problems stick around before something is done? I use the squeaky door indicator. How long before it gets fixed and who fixes it? This often reflects the attitude of the whole team. Is one person always the person who fixes things or does it vary over time?

  • Do product problems get addressed in a reasonable time? Or are we dealing with major issues that have dragged on for a few releases?

  • How much time is invested in developing team members?

  • Do team members have the opportunity to put their ideas into practice?

  • What’s the current life cycle duration from a customer’s request to delivering it to them?

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Three Types of Metrics Defined by ITIL

Three Types of Metrics Defined by ITIL
By Michael Scarborough

An important aspect described in the ITIL Continual Service Improvement book involves the various types of metrics that ITIL recommends and how they are used. The three types of metrics ITIL identifies are technology, process, and service. In this post, I will describe these three types of metrics and provide some examples of each.

  1. Technology Metrics

    Technology metrics measure specific aspects of the IT infrastructure and equipment. In most IT organizations, we are somewhat overwhelmed with the availability of various technology metrics. Some example technology metrics include:

    • CPU utilization of a server
    • Amount of disk space utilized

    • Speed of a network interface

    While technology metrics are abundant, they only provide information about a small piece of the service management environment and potentially only supply information about a tiny technical aspect of a service.

  2. Process Metrics

    Process metrics measure some specific aspect of a process.

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Five Steps to Quality Management of Your Project

Five Steps to Quality Management of Your Project
By Michelle Symonds

Producing a high quality project depends on many factors, and maintaining control over quality whilst also sticking to timescales and budget is a challenge every project manager has to face. Knowing how to control the quality of your project from the outset is critical in achieving excellence, so with that in mind, these five steps will help you to produce high quality projects time after time.

  • Step 1: Make a robust project plan

    Before you start anything, you must implement a well thought out project plan. How you achieve this will depend on your own style of project management, but the key factor is to ensure you have included all deliverables, timescales and budgets in your project plan, and also built in some room for manoeuvre. Project plans are not static documents, and need to be refined and revised as the project opens out, so work to a cycle of Plan, Do, Check and Act to ensure your project plan is flexible.

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Recommended PM App

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